Fav Moss Types

If you are wondering just which mosses will suit your needs, here are a few specific bryophyte types that meet the “right place, right plant” concept for a range of landscape projects. These are just a few of Mossin’ Annie’s favorite mosses used in Mountain Moss installations. As we all start to explore mosses, more research combined with field-testing, will reveal even more options. Go Green With Moss!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 





19 Responses to “Fav Moss Types”

  1. 1
    debbie

    hello
    i found a type of moss (or i think it is) on a concreat sidewalk next to my house and was trying to find out what kind it was? I live in south eastern part of indiana and i am a big fan of plants!!! I would like to see if i could get this plant to grow for me in my home until spring so i can put it in my back yard to grow, where it is shady and wet that time of year,there are so many sites on the web, so i thought maybe this is the one to help???
    thanks
    debbie

  2. 2

    Hey Debbie,
    As you’ve discovered, mosses are all around you… even in the sidewalk cracks. Without a photo for reference, it is a guessing game… but, most likely, you’ve found a type of Bryum or Ceratodon. These tiny mosses are like velvet cushions of bright green. Right now, Bryum is just starting to get its teeny sporophytes (less than 1/4 inch tall)… at least here in NC. You might have found an Entodon or other moss type that grows prostrate (sideways).

    It’s not necessary to bring your new moss colony inside in winter because ALL mosses tolerate freezing temps. They won’t even mind the snowy winters of Indiana. You can plant it NOW! And, usually these sidewalk mosses don’t need shade (most prefer sun locations). The key is providing a moisture niche. Plant in a depression, between stepping stones or some location where moisture normally accumulates. Don’t provide any “good” soil. Just clear the area of debris. Water and walk on it. YES… step on your precious mosses. It will not hurt them but just help them connect to the soil.

    Be aware that sometimes these mosses will not be green… but transitioning with shades of brown and reddish-brown. Don’t despair. This dormant stage will dramatically change with NEW green growth after a few weeks (example: Atrichum).

    Go Ahead and Go Green With Moss NOW!
    Mossin’ Annie

  3. 3
    Clare Greuling

    I live in Michigan and I’m looking for a moss between stepping stones in my garden area. This moss will be walked on occasionally.

  4. 4

    Hey Clare,
    First, ALL mosses can be walked on! In fact, I recommend walking on mosses to help their rhizoids attach. Second, it would be important to know more about the sun exposure of your garden area where the stepping stones are located. Also, I’d consider the drainage patterns of the area. It is important to assess the entire micro-climate of your target location to determine which bryophytes are RIGHT for your RIGHT location… Right place, right plant still apply in choosing the appropriate mosses for your project. If you’d like to contact me back directly, please send additional information that might be important in choosing RIGHT mosses from our exclusive selection of bryophytes in our online Moss Shop for your needs: mossinannie@gmail.com.

    Mosses in between stepping stones of a path or patio add an awesome impact!

    Go Green With Moss!
    Mossin’ Annie

  5. 5
    Chip

    Hello,

    I live in Northern Virginia and would like to start growing moss on a tin roof in shade/partial sun. Is there a type of moss that will grow on tin and if so, what types would you recommend? If not, can I prepare the environment on the roof in such a way to allow for and sustain the growth of moss? Thanks for your help!

  6. 6
    Sherri

    Hi! I have begun growing orchids and mounting them on wood slabs I get from trees that have been cut down in my area – Chicago, Illinois. Is there a moss that grows well on wood inside the home in a brightly lit room? I would take the stuff on my trees inside to try it, but I’m not sure it’s actually moss. It actually looks like lichen or maybe even mold!

  7. 7

    Hey Chip,
    Mountain Moss installed a moss green roof at the NC Arboretum in June 2012. The original tin roof was left in tact and we added EnkaDrain substrate between the ribs. The mosses can attach to the felt top layer and require little to no soil added. Why don’t you check out my photo essay with narrative on the production of this green roof? You can learn step by step what to do as you transform your own tin roof. Moss types used for this direct sun green roof would work for you, too. Let me know if Mountain Moss can help you make your own moss green roof a reality. Mossin’ Annie
    picasaweb.google.com/118327841512493525469/MountainMossNCArboretumMossGreenRoofJune2012

  8. 8
    Deejanay

    hello! I found a yellow moss in the water, what could it possibly be?

  9. 9
    kyle

    any moss can survive fully submerse in water?

  10. 10

    Hey Deejanay,
    Most likely, you’ve found a Sphagnum species. Right now, my Sphagnum palustre is golden bronze. Sphagnums particularly like living at the water’s edge or in moist boggy areas.
    Send me a close-up photo for a better look.
    Thanks,
    Mossin’ Annie

  11. 11

    Hey Kyle,
    YES. There are aquatic mosses like Fontinalis that actually live under the water. Also, Sphagnum mosses like to live at the water’s edge. They can handle partial submersion or short periods of full submersion.
    Mossin’ Annie

  12. 12
    Leon

    Hi – I have taken some pics of really nice moss that has grown inside a peddle tractor open trailer. A few yrs ago I remember filling it up with some soil and threw mulch in there along with other organic materials, but never got a chance to plant what I wanted. Well, now I noticed for the first time that it is filled with beautiful vibrant bright green moss that is so soft to the touch. I am having a hard time identifying it. Is there somebody I can email pics?

  13. 13

    Greetings Leon,
    Identification of some bryophytes can be challenging because they are so tiny. Microscopic examination might be necessary to accurately identify species. However, there are some common types that can be classified to genus by viewing photos. Take really close-up photos. If possible, get shots of sporophytes as well (a definitive characteristic). Send your photos to me directly and I’ll try to assist you. When I have trouble identifying mosses, I use an ID key of botanical characteristics,microscopes and my reference books — Mosses of Eastern North America by Drs. Crum and Anderson. To confirm certain species, I sometimes turn to my bryologist friends for a professional consultation and identification. With over 10,000 mosses in the world, I have not learned them all.

    Anyhow, send photos and I’ll try to help you out in your moss ID quest.
    Go Green With Moss!
    Mossin’ Annie
    mossinannie@gmail.com

  14. 14
    Pat Deuel

    Hi, bought a home in northern NJ on a small lake. We have mostly red oaks (old) on the property and had not much sun. Two hurricanes and 4 years have removed the trees from the immediate area of the house ( for safety and cleanup) and left a sunnier area in some spots The actual house and property sit on large granite type rock ledges and outcroppings, with a small back yard over the septic field. The property had 80%moss filled with weeds (strawberry, crown vetch (I hate that person) and broad leafs) I attempted to pull out weeds, etc but as the sun areas grew so did the weeds. I have many types of moss (have started digital pics to be able to id) and on and around the rock area (80% of frontage 350′ x40) and my much loved lichens of many shades of green to greys. I read up on one of your articles of spot squiting weed killer (my neighbor does that and his moss side yard is beautiful (also has been working on it 25years) and that you were going to try immergence type weed control. Have you and how has it gone? I am concerned about Roundup types as I am across the street from the lake. I know I still have to dig/eradicate existing weeds but can I do emergent product also and expect some better results down the road. PS I needed a new goal in my retirement years, and a challange. any help is appreicated. Love your website, which is huge with info. Thanks again.

  15. 15
    Annika

    which of these mosses grows the fastest? which one absorbs the most carbon dioxide? (if you know that) And how long exactly does it take for the fastest moss to grow?

  16. 16
    Jeff

    I keep Poison Dart Frog in high humidity vivariums, looking for moss recommendations.

  17. 17
    Judy Fennell

    I have started a fairy garden along my garage wall facing N. It is shady to some sun, ferns do well. Would like to start assortment of mosses and like the looks of the mounding moss for sure. I live in Northern Indiana right at Lake Michigan and this winter tons of snow. Unusual though.

    Thniking of one of your mixed trays. Suggestions would be appreciated.

  18. 18
    Alex

    If you wouldn’t mind, I would appreciate some advice. I’m in the planning process of a 2 gallon glass terrarium jar that will be getting indirect sun. I intend to use some Bryoandersonia illecebra from around the house, and I’m looking for 1 or 2 additional mosses to use. Could you please recommend some additional mosses- or even point me in the direction of a genus!- that would work well in this setting without being too invasive? (I want to make sure all of them have ample room to prosper.) Thank you very much for your time and assistance.

  19. 19

    I’d like to link to this page as a resource for a new blog post I’m writing about different varieties of moss. I think my readers will find this information invaluable, so rather than copy the pieces of interest I’ll include a further reading link at the end of the post, if it’s ok with you.


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